Grow communities / Training / Guide your own ruku: Mātauranga Māori / Mōhiotanga Finding mātauranga (30 minutes)

There are lots of ways you can connect with mātauranga Māori in your communities. Connections and knowledge can come from anywhere – some might even surprise you. This activity will help you explore what knowledge already exists in your community.

Purpose

This activity will help you and your team understand where in your community you can connect with mātauranga Māori. This might be people, places, spaces or organisations that can support you as a whānau supporter, or can walk alongside parents and whānau on their journey to reawaken DNA.

Background

As a part of providing good support for whānau, knowing what activities, services there are in your local community can be very helpful. There are many places where whānau might be able to grow their own confidence and knowledge in mātauranga Māori.

The most common place to connect with te ao Māori may be your local marae, but connections and knowledge can come from many places, people, groups, online spaces or even libraries.

In the Tākai Kōrero webinar mātauranga Māori – reawakening DNA, Whaea Deb talks about where she finds mātauranga Māori. Deb likes to listen to kōrero in the whare kai, noting the importance of the workers kōrero, and not just the formal speeches on the paepae.

Watch the video

Watch this clip with your group to kick off your discussion and community mapping activity. In this video Deb Rewiri talks about the places she surrounds herself with mātauranga Māori.

Community mapping activity (15 minutes)

Brainstorm your local activities, organisations, groups, services, places and spaces where you and the whānau you work with can connect with mātauranga Māori. This might include marae, social services, kapa haka groups.

How to do it

Write the question on the large paper or whiteboard: Where could we go to connect with mātauranga Māori?

Introduce the activity. Give everyone post-it notes and ask them to brainstorm all of the places they can connect with mātauranga.

Invite everyone to add their post-it notes on the board. Once everyone has added their post-its, have a discussion as a group and theme the ideas. You could group them into categories or draw links.

You may want to display your community map. Highlight your mātaraunga Māori connections and continue to add to it as you gain more knowledge and insight.

Extras

To go further, you could print or find a physical map of your community and add 'pins' with a key to identify places, spaces and people.

This activity could also be completed individually using the downloadable A3 template.

Handout: Community mapping activity A3 template [PDF, 116 KB]

You could also use the template as a slide to run the activity online.

Workshop materials

  • Pens
  • Post-it notes
  • A piece of large paper – flipchart or butchers paper works well
  • (Optional) An A3 print out of the activity template

Group discussion (10 minutes)

After the activity, use these discussion prompts to ruku a bit deeper:

  • How could you connect with these groups and organisations to build your own kete?
  • What are the opportunities?
  • Were there any new people or places, or surprising ones?

Resources

Related articles

At the marae, I learn about...

More than just a boil up – helping new māmā and pāpā connect

Other resources

Maramataka Online | All Right? (external link)